New version of fsfsverify released!

I’ve been hard at work for the past couple of weeks, and I’m proud to announce that an updated fsfsverify script is available. Functionally, the only difference is the addition of svndiff1 support. Underneath, the great majority of the code has changed to make it easier to support different types of svndiff streams. It should also be easier to hack, if you find yourself needing to add a feature. Enjoy!

More fsfsverify updates...

Things are going well on the fsfsverify front. I’ve run the new code through a number of tests, and it’s performing just as well as the old one. If this keeps up, I’ll have it out the door this week.

Updates to fsfsverify coming...

I’ve been hard at work on a new version of fsfsverify that handles the new svndiff1 format. I also took it as an opportunity to rewrite large portions of it, because it’s clearly leading a life of it’s own. So far it has seen 330 downloads by 278 unique ip addresses since June of last year. I’m sure many of those were people just curious about the script. However, I know people are indeed using it, since I get emails declaring success, and occasionally ones that ended in failure (hey, I can’t fix data loss).

Number of active cpus on a Mac...

One nifty feature on most modern macs is that you can disable processors on the fly. Up front, that doesn’t sound like much of a benefit, but in reality it is. As a developer, I can examine the compute time using different processor configurations, and see how well the software scales.

Ergonomics and Dvorak...

After working some ridiculous hours for a number of weeks, I managed to get RSI in my right arm. It wasn’t too bad. It mainly ached, no sharp pains or anything of that sort. However, I decided to take a look at a few things to see if there was something that I could change (posture, keyboard height, mouse, etc) or learn to help combat RSI. So, I bought a new keyboard tray (my keyboard sits just a little too high), switched to a track ball, and have been learning Dvorak.